Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Sphagnum affine

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Sphagnum affine, Sphagnum affine var. flagellare

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

Common names:

Sphagnum

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Sphagnum affine: 33]

 

 

Popularity of Sphagnum affine over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Sphagnum affine (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Sphagnum affine as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 138]

 

Sphagnum (6), Dispersal (4), bryophyte (3), Metapopulation (3), Peatmosses (3), AFLP (2), Bryophyte evolution (2), Fragmentation (2), microsatellites (2), Miocene (2), molecular evolution (2), Peatlands (2), phylogeography (2), population genetics (2), population structure (2), 3′ UTR. (1), Amazon (1), amphi-Atlantic disjunction (1), ancestral shared polymorphism (1), Antarctic organisms, and biodiversity (1), Antarctica, climatic crucible of evolution (1), Asexuality (1), autocorrelation (1), Biogeography (1), biogeography and macroevolution (1), bottleneck (1), carbon dioxide uptake (1), carbon isotope discrimination (1), chloroplast DNA (1), climate (1), clonality (1), coalescent (1), coalescent theory (1), constraints on adaptation (1), cpDNA (1), DNA fingerprinting (1), Dyad symmetrical elements (1), ecotype differentiation (1), Edge (1), environmental change (1), Fatty acids (1), Fatty alcohols (1), Forest (1), founder effect (1), GAM (1), gene flow (1), Genetic diversity (1), genetic structure (1), glacial refugia (1), Ground vegetation (1), humification (1), indicator values (1), intercontinental migration (1), intragametophytic selfing (1), introduced species (1), inverse isolation hypothesis (1), inversions (1), island biogeography (1), island colonization (1), isolation by distance nrITS (1), isolation with migration (1), K-function (1), liverworts (1), long-distance dispersal (1), Mantel test (1), marine environment (1), Mediterranean Basin (1), n-Alkanes (1), New Zealand (1), Nomenclature follows Lid & Lid (1994) for vascular plants, Frisvoll et al. (1995) for bryophytes, and Krog et al. (1980) for lichens except that, in our study, Cladina is separated from Cladonia at the genus level (1), noncoding chloroplast DNA (1), non-permanent plots (1), northwest North America (1), notothenioid fish (1), O. obtusifolium (1), Old growth forest (1), ombrotrophic bog (1), Orthotrichum speciosum (1), Peat (1), peat bog (1), peatmoss (1), Permanent plot (1), photosynthesis (1), phylodemography (1), phylogenetics (1), Picea abies (1), plant macrofossils (1), plant population and community dynamics (1), productivity (1), promoter (1), Protected forest (1), Radula flaccida (1), range expansion (1), recombination (1), repeats (1), reproductive biology (1), Scotland (1), Southern hemisphere biota (1), species optimum (1), Sphagnum affine (1), Sphagnum imbricatum (1), Sphagnum magellanicum (1), Sphagnum-dominated peatlands (1), Sterols (1), sub-Antarctic, Antarctic biota (1), testate amoebae (1), Triterpenoids (1), Vegetation change (1), vegetation dynamics (1), vegetative growth (1), vicariance versus dispersal (1), Wax esters (1), weighted averaging (1), Woodland key habitat (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

nut (59.75), ornamental (18.31), oilseed/fat (9.60), genetics (4.39), medicinal (1.07), fruit (0.78), poison (0.77), weed (0.59), boundary (0.53), starch (0.35)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

De Vriendt L, Lemay M-A, Jean M, Renaut S, Pellerin S, Joly S, Belzile F and Poulin M (2016) Population isolation shapes plant genetics, phenotype and germination in naturally patchy ecosystems. J Plant Ecol, rtw071. http://jpe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/rtw071v2

Désamoré A, Patińo J, Mardulyn P, McDaniel SF, Zanatta F, Laenen B and Vanderpoorten A (2016) High migration rates shape the postglacial history of amphi-Atlantic bryophytes. Molecular Ecology 25, 5568-84. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.13839

Kyrkjeeide MO, Hassel K, Flatberg KI, Shaw AJ, Brochmann C and Stenřien HK (2016) Long-distance dispersal and barriers shape genetic structure of peatmosses (Sphagnum) across the Northern Hemisphere. Journal of Biogeography 43, 1215-26. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jbi.12716

Swindles GT, Turner TE, Roe HM, Hall VA and Rea HA (2015) Testing the cause of the Sphagnum austinii (Sull. ex Aust.) decline: Multiproxy evidence from a raised bog in Northern Ireland. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 213, 17-26. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0034666714001602

Weston DJ, Timm CM, Walker AP, Gu L, Muchero W, Schmutz J, Shaw AJ, Tuskan GA, Warren JM and Wullschleger SD (2015) Sphagnum physiology in the context of changing climate: emergent influences of genomics, modelling and host–microbiome interactions on understanding ecosystem function. Plant, Cell & Environment 38, 1737-51. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pce.12458

Shaw AJ, Shaw B, Johnson MG, Higuchi M, Arikawa T, Ueno T and Devos N (2013) Origins, genetic structure, and systematics of the narrow endemic peatmosses (Sphagnum): S. guwassanense and S. triseriporum (Sphagnaceae). Am. J. Botany 100, 1202-20. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/100/6/1202

Kyrkjeeide MO, Hassel K, Flatberg KI and Stenoien HK (2012) The rare peat moss Sphagnum wulfianum (Sphagnaceae) did not survive the last glacial period in northern European refugia. Am. J. Botany 99, 677-89. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/4/677

Rogers AD (2012) Evolution and Biodiversity of Antarctic Organisms. In ‘Antarctic Ecosystems’. (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 417-67. (John Wiley & Sons, Ltd). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781444347241.ch14

Szövényi P, Sundberg S and Shaw AJ (2012) Long-distance dispersal and genetic structure of natural populations: an assessment of the inverse isolation hypothesis in peat mosses. Molecular Ecology 21, 5461-72. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.12055

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Sphagnum affine: 33; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Shaw AJ, Shaw B, Johnson MG, Higuchi M, Arikawa T, Ueno T and Devos N (2013) Origins, genetic structure, and systematics of the narrow endemic peatmosses (Sphagnum): S. guwassanense and S. triseriporum (Sphagnaceae). Am. J. Botany 100, 1202-1220. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/100/6/1202

Kyrkjeeide MO, Hassel K, Flatberg KI and Stenoien HK (2012) The rare peat moss Sphagnum wulfianum (Sphagnaceae) did not survive the last glacial period in northern European refugia. Am. J. Botany 99, 677-689. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/4/677

Rogers AD (2012) Evolution and Biodiversity of Antarctic Organisms. In ‘Antarctic Ecosystems’. (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 417-467. (John Wiley & Sons, Ltd). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781444347241.ch14

Szövényi P, Sundberg S and Shaw AJ (2012) Long-distance dispersal and genetic structure of natural populations: an assessment of the inverse isolation hypothesis in peat mosses. Molecular Ecology 21, 5461-5472. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.12055

Kapfer J, Grytnes J-A, Gunnarsson U and Birks HJB (2011) Fine-scale changes in vegetation composition in a boreal mire over 50 years. Journal of Ecology 99, 1179-1189. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2011.01847.x

Karlin EF, Andrus RE, Boles SB and Shaw AJ (2011) One haploid parent contributes 100% of the gene pool for a widespread species in northwest North America. Molecular Ecology 20, 753-767. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04982.x

Schrey AW, Grispo M, Awad M, Cook MB, McCoy ED, Mushinsky HR, Albayrak T, Bensch S, Burke T, Butler LK, Dor R, Fokidis HB, Jensen H, Imboma T, Kessler-Rios MM, Marzal A, Stewart IRK, Westerdahl H, Westneat DF, Zehtindjiev P and Martin LB (2011) Broad-scale latitudinal patterns of genetic diversity among native European and introduced house sparrow (Passer domesticus) populations. Molecular Ecology 20, 1133-1143. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05001.x

Stenřien HK, Shaw AJ, Shaw B, Hassel K and Gunnarsson U (2011) NORTH AMERICAN ORIGIN AND RECENT EUROPEAN ESTABLISHMENTS OF THE AMPHI-ATLANTIC PEAT MOSS SPHAGNUM ANGERMANICUM. Evolution 65, 1181-1194. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01191.x

Shaw AJ, Cox CJ, Buck WR, Devos N, Buchanan AM, Cave L, Seppelt R, Shaw B, Larrain J, Andrus R, Greilhuber J and Temsch EM (2010) Newly resolved relationships in an early land plant lineage: Bryophyta class Sphagnopsida (peat mosses). Am. J. Botany 97, 1511-1531. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/97/9/1511

Shaw AJ, Devos N, Cox CJ, Boles SB, Shaw B, Buchanan AM, Cave L and Seppelt R (2010) Peatmoss (Sphagnum) diversification associated with Miocene Northern Hemisphere climatic cooling? Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55, 1139-1145. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1055790310000229

Whitaker DL and Edwards J (2010) Sphagnum Moss Disperses Spores with Vortex Rings. Science 329, 406-. http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/329/5990/406

McClymont EL, Mauquoy D, Yeloff D, Broekens P, van Geel B, Charman DJ, Pancost RD, Chambers FM and Evershed RP (2008) The disappearance of Sphagnum imbricatum from Butterburn Flow, UK. The Holocene 18, 991-1002. http://hol.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/18/6/991

Pohjamo M, Korpelainen H and Kalinauskaitė N (2008) Restricted gene flow in the clonal hepatic Trichocolea tomentella in fragmented landscapes. Biological Conservation 141, 1204-1217. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320708000736

SzÖVÉNyi P, Terracciano S, Ricca M, Giordano S and Shaw AJ (2008) Recent divergence, intercontinental dispersal and shared polymorphism are shaping the genetic structure of amphi-Atlantic peatmoss populations. Molecular Ecology 17, 5364-5377. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.04003.x

Grundmann M, Ansell SW, Russell SJ, Koch MA and Vogel JC (2007) Genetic structure of the widespread and common Mediterranean bryophyte Pleurochaete squarrosa (Brid.) Lindb. (Pottiaceae) — evidence from nuclear and plastidic DNA sequence variation and allozymes. Molecular Ecology 16, 709-722. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03181.x

Gunnarsson U, Shaw AJ and LÖNn M (2007) Local-scale genetic structure in the peatmoss Sphagnum fuscum. Molecular Ecology 16, 305-312. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2006.03144.x

Pharo EJ and Zartman CE (2007) Bryophytes in a changing landscape: The hierarchical effects of habitat fragmentation on ecological and evolutionary processes. Biological Conservation 135, 315-325. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000632070600440X

Rogers AD (2007) Evolution and biodiversity of Antarctic organisms: a molecular perspective. Phil Trans R Soc B 362, 2191-2214. http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/content/abstract/362/1488/2191

Vanderpoorten A, Rumsey FJ and Carine MA (2007) Does Macaronesia exist? Conflicting signal in the bryophyte and pteridophyte floras. Am. J. Botany 94, 625-639. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/94/4/625

Szövényi P, Hock Z, Urmi E and Schneller JJ (2006) Contrasting phylogeographic patterns in Sphagnum fimbriatum and Sphagnum squarrosum (Bryophyta, Sphagnopsida) in Europe. New Phytologist 172, 784-794. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2006.01870.x

Zartman CE, McDaniel SF and Shaw AJ (2006) Experimental habitat fragmentation increases linkage disequilibrium but does not affect genetic diversity or population structure in the Amazonian liverwort Radula flaccida. Molecular Ecology 15, 2305-2315. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2006.02929.x

Hassel K, Sastad SM, Gunnarsson U and Soderstrom L (2005) Genetic variation and structure in the expanding moss Pogonatum dentatum (Polytrichaceae) in its area of origin and in a recently colonized area. Am. J. Botany 92, 1684-1690. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/92/10/1684

Langdon PG and Barber KE (2005) The climate of Scotland over the last 5000 years inferred from multiproxy peatland records: inter-site correlations and regional variability. Journal of Quaternary Science 20, 549-566. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jqs.934

Sundberg S (2005) Larger capsules enhance short-range spore dispersal in Sphagnum, but what happens further away? Oikos 108, 115-124. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0030-1299.2005.12916.x

SnÄLl T, Fogelqvist J, Ribeiro PJ and Lascoux M (2004) Spatial genetic structure in two congeneric epiphytes with different dispersal strategies analysed by three different methods. Molecular Ecology 13, 2109-2119. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2004.02217.x

Malmer N, Albinsson C, Svensson BM and Wallén B (2003) Interferences between Sphagnum and vascular plants: effects on plant community structure and peat formation. Oikos 100, 469-482. http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0706.2003.12170.x

Quandt D, Müller K and Huttunen S (2003) Characterisation of the Chloroplast DNA psbT-H Region and the Influence of Dyad Symmetrical Elements on Phylogenetic Reconstructions. Plant Biology 5, 400-410. http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2003-42715

Wilson PJ and Provan J (2003) Effect of habitat fragmentation on levels and patterns of genetic diversity in natural populations of the peat moss Polytrichum commune. Proc R Soc B 270, 881-886. http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/content/abstract/270/1517/881

(2001) Author index. Heredity 87, 712-716. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2540.2001.00712.x

Thingsgaard K (2001) Population structure and genetic diversity of the amphiatlantic haploid peatmoss Sphagnum affine (Sphagnopsida). Heredity (Edinb) 87, 485-96.

Baas M, Pancost R, van Geel B and Sinninghe Damsté JS (2000) A comparative study of lipids in Sphagnum species. Organic Geochemistry 31, 535-541. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0146638000000371

Nygaard PH and Řdegaard T (1999) Sixty years of vegetation dynamics in a south boreal coniferous forest in southern Norway. Journal of Vegetation Science 10, 5-16. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3237155

Rice SK and Giles L (1996) The influence of water content and leaf anatomy on carbon isotope discrimination and photosynthesis in Sphagnum. Plant, Cell & Environment 19, 118-124. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3040.1996.tb00233.x

(1889) RECORD OF CURRENT LITERATURE. Ann. Bot. os-3, 449-. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org

Shaw AJ, Cox CJ, Buck WR, Devos N, Buchanan AM, Cave L, Seppelt R, Shaw B, Larrain J, Andrus R, Greilhuber J and Temsch EM Newly resolved relationships in an early land plant lineage: Bryophyta class Sphagnopsida (peat mosses). Am. J. Botany 97, 1511-1531. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/97/9/1511

Shaw AJ, Devos N, Cox CJ, Boles SB, Shaw B, Buchanan AM, Cave L and Seppelt R Peatmoss (Sphagnum) diversification associated with Miocene Northern Hemisphere climatic cooling? Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55, 1139-1145. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1055790310000229

Whitaker DL and Edwards J Sphagnum Moss Disperses Spores with Vortex Rings. Science 329, 406-. http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/329/5990/406

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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