Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Rosa macrophylla

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Rosa macrophylla

 

This species has also been known as:

Rosa macrophylla var. crasseaculeata, Rosa macrophylla var. hypoleuca, Rosa macrophylla var. macrophylla

 

No common names have been found

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Rosa macrophylla: 13]

 

 

Popularity of Rosa macrophylla over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Rosa macrophylla (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Rosa macrophylla as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 44]

 

Alien species (2), Bhutan (2), Elevation (2), Energy analysis (2), Floristics (2), Fodder collection (2), Garhwal Himalaya (2), Lean period (2), Mixed conifer forests (2), Plant invasions (2), Species richness (2), Women drudgery (2), Biotechnology (1), black spot disease (1), corn-stalk (1), cutaneous sporotrichosis (1), disease management (1), environmental sources (1), Group selection tree harvest (1), Inhabitants (1), Marssonina rosae (1), Parvati valley (1), Phytotherapy (1), Regeneration (1), Rosa (1), Rural timber (1), Single-tree harvest (1), soil (1), sphagnum moss (1), Sporothrix schenckii (1), Traditional (1), Western Himalayas (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

fodder (98.44), fuelwood (0.95), fruit (0.05), poison (0.05), medicinal (0.04), weed (0.04), genetics (0.04), ornamental (0.03), starch (0.02), timber (0.02)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Wissemann V (2017) Conventional Taxonomy (Wild Roses). In Reference Module in Life Sciences. (Ed.^(Eds  pp. (Elsevier). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128096338050172

Rix M (2014) 795. ROSA MOYESII FORMA ROSEA. Curtiss Botanical Magazine 31, 260-270. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/curt.12078

Bajpai D and Inderjit (2013) Impact of nitrogen availability and soil communities on biomass accumulation of an invasive species. AoB Plants 5, plt045-. http://aobpla.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/5/0/plt045

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Rosa macrophylla: 13; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Dhyani S, Maikhuri RK and Dhyani D (2011) Energy budget of fodder harvesting pattern along the altitudinal gradient in Garhwal Himalaya, India. Biomass and Bioenergy 35, 1823-32. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0961953411000237

Khuroo AA, Weber E, Malik AH, Reshi ZA and Dar GH (2011) Altitudinal distribution patterns of the native and alien woody flora in Kashmir Himalaya, India. Environmental Research 111, 967-77. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001393511100123X

Moktan MR, Gratzer G, Richards WH, Rai TB and Dukpa D (2009) Regeneration and structure of mixed conifer forests under single-tree harvest management in the western Bhutan Himalayas. Forest Ecology and Management 258, 243-55. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112709002795

Moktan MR, Gratzer G, Richards WH, Rai TB, Dukpa D and Tenzin K (2009) Regeneration of mixed conifer forests under group tree selection harvest management in western Bhutan Himalayas. Forest Ecology and Management 257, 2121-32. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112709001376

Gachomo EW and Kotchoni SO (2007) Detailed description of developmental growth stages of Diplocarpon rosae in Rosa: a core building block for efficient disease management. Annals of Applied Biology 151, 233-43. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-7348.2007.00167.x

Mehta KIS, Sharma NL, Kanga AK, Mahajan VK and Ranjan N (2007) Isolation of Sporothrix schenckii from the environmental sources of cutaneous sporotrichosis patients in Himachal Pradesh, India: results of a pilot study. Mycoses 50, 496-501. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0507.2007.01411.x

Anonymous (2004) Subject Index. In ‘Encyclopedia of Forest Sciences’. (Ed.^(Eds Editor-in-Chief:   Jeffery B) pp. 1-133. (Elsevier: Oxford). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B0121451607003513

Sharma PK, Chauhan NS and Lal B (2004) Observations on the traditional phytotherapy among the inhabitants of Parvati valley in western Himalaya, India. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 92, 167-76. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874103004616

Tiwari BK and Rani S (2004) MEDICINAL, FOOD AND AROMATIC PLANTS | Edible Products from the Forest. In ‘Encyclopedia of Forest Sciences’. (Ed.^(Eds Editor-in-Chief:   Jeffery B) pp. 541-50. (Elsevier: Oxford). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B0121451607002581

 

Anonymous (2003) Subject Index. In ‘Encyclopedia of Rose Science’. (Ed.^(Eds Editor-in-Chief:   Andrew VR) pp. 1-49. (Elsevier: Oxford). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B0122276205900132

 

Schilling T (1997) Conservation in Nepal. IV: The Mount Everest (Sagarmatha) National Park. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine 14, 153-66. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8748.00094

Negi AK and Todaria NP (1993) Fuelwood evaluation of some Himalayan trees and shrubs. Energy 18, 799-801. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/036054429390058L

Schilling T (1988) CONSERVATION IN NEPAL I, THE LANGTANG NATIONAL PARK. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine 5, 24-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8748.1988.tb00109.x

Anonymous (1890) SUMMARY OF CURRENT RESEARCHES RELATING TO ZOOLOGY AND BOTANY: BOTANY. Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society 10, 617-58. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2818.1890.tb00801.x

Forbes FB and Hemsley WB (1887) An Enumeration of all the Plants known from China Proper, Formosa, Hainan, Corea, the Luchu Archipelago, and the Island of Hongkong, together with their Distribution and Synonymy.—Part IV. Journal of the Linnean Society of London, Botany 23, 241-348. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8339.1887.tb00533.x

Watt G (1881) Notes on the Vegetation &c. of Chumba State and British Lahoul; with Descriptions of New Species. Journal of the Linnean Society of London, Botany 18, 368-82. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8339.1881.tb01260.x

Dhyani S, Maikhuri RK and Dhyani D Energy budget of fodder harvesting pattern along the altitudinal gradient in Garhwal Himalaya, India. Biomass and Bioenergy 35, 1823-32. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0961953411000237

Khuroo AA, Weber E, Malik AH, Reshi ZA and Dar GH Altitudinal distribution patterns of the native and alien woody flora in Kashmir Himalaya, India. Environmental Research 111, 967-77. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001393511100123X

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW